Ambassador to Paris decorated his salon

In 1748 the British Ambassador to Paris decorated his salon with blue flock wallpaper, which then became very fashionable there. In the 1760s the French manufacturer Jean-Baptiste Réveillon hired designers working in silk and tapestry to produce some of the most subtle and luxurious wallpaper ever made. His sky blue wallpaper with fleurs-de-lys was used in 1783 on the first balloons by the Montgolfier brothers.[2] The landscape painter Jean-Baptiste Pillement discovered in 1763 a method to use fast colours. Hand-blocked wallpapers like these use hand-carved blocks and by the 18th century designs include panoramic views of antique architecture, exotic landscapes and pastoral subjects, as well as repeating patterns of stylized flowers, people and animals. In 1785 Christophe-Philippe Oberkampf had invented the first machine for printing coloured tints on sheets of wallpaper. In 1799 Louis-Nicolas Robert patented a machine to produce continuous lengths of paper, the forerunner of the Fourdrinier machine. This ability to produce continuous lengths of wallpaper now offered the prospect of novel designs and nice tints being widely displayed in drawing rooms across Europe.[3] Wallpaper manufacturers active in England in the 18th century included John Baptist Jackson[2] and John Sherringham.[4] Among the firms established in 18th-century America: J. F. Bumstead & Co. (Boston), William Poyntell (Philadelphia), John Rugar (New York).[2] High-quality wallpaper made in China became available from the later part of the 17th century; this was entirely handpainted and very expensive. It can still be seen in rooms in palaces and grand houses including Nymphenburg Palace, Łazienki Palace, Chatsworth House, Temple Newsam, Lissan House, and Erddig. It was made up to 1.2 metres wide. English, French and German manufacturers imitated it, usually beginning with a printed outline which was coloured in by hand, a technique sometimes also used in later Chinese papers. 19th century France and America Towards the end of the 18th century the fashion for scenic wallpaper revived in both England and France, leading to some enormous panoramas, like the 1804 20 strip wide panorama, Sauvages de la Mer du Pacifique (Savages of the Pacific), designed by the artist Jean-Gabriel Charvet for the French manufacturer Joseph Dufour et Cie showing the Voyages of Captain Cook.[5] This famous so called “papier peint” wallpaper is still in situ in Ham House, Peabody Massachusetts.[6] It was the largest panoramic wallpaper of its time, and marked the burgeoning of a French industry in panoramic wallpapers. Dufour realized almost immediate success from the sale of these papers and enjoyed a lively trade with America. The Neoclassical style currently in favour worked well in houses of the Federal period with Charvet’s elegant designs. Like most 18th-century wallpapers, the panorama was designed to be hung above a dado. ‘Sauvages de la Mer Pacifique’, panels 1-10 of woodblock printed wallpaper designed by Jean-Gabriel Charvet and manufactured by Joseph Dufour Beside Joseph Dufour et Cie (1797 – c. 1830) other French manufacturers of panoramic scenic and trompe l’œil wallpapers, Zuber et Cie (1797–present) and Arthur et Robert exported their product across Europe and North America. Zuber et Cie’s c. 1834 design Views of North America[7] hangs in the Diplomatic Reception Room of the White House. While Joseph Dufour et Cie was shut down in the 1830s, Zuber et Cie still exists and with Cole & Son of England is one of the last Western producers of woodblock printed wallpapers. For its production Zuber uses woodblocks out of an archive of more than 100,000 cut in the 19th century which are classified as a “Historical Monument”. It offers panoramic sceneries such as “Vue de l’Amérique Nord”, “Eldorado Hindoustan” or “Isola Bella” and also wallpapers, friezes and ceilings as well as hand-printed furnishing fabrics. Among the firms begun in France in the 19th century: Desfossé & Karth.[2] In the United States: John Bellrose, Blanchard & Curry, Howell Brothers, Longstreth & Sons, Isaac Pugh in Philadelphia; Bigelow, Hayden & Co. in Massachusetts; Christy & Constant, A. Harwood, R. Prince in New York.[8] England “Artichoke” wallpaper by Morris and Co, designed by J H Dearle During the Napoleonic Wars, trade between Europe and Britain evaporated, resulting in the gradual decline of the wallpaper industry in Britain. However, the end of the war saw a massive demand in Europe for British goods which had been inaccessible during the wars, including cheap, colourful wallpaper. The development of steam-powered printing presses in Britain in 1813 allowed manufacturers to mass-produce wallpaper, reducing its price and so making it affordable to working-class people. Wallpaper enjoyed a huge boom in popularity in the nineteenth century, seen as a cheap and very effective way of brightening up cramped and dark rooms in working-class areas. It became almost the norm in most areas of middle-class homes, but remained relatively little used in public buildings and offices, with patterns generally being avoided in such locations. In the latter half of the century Lincrusta and Anaglypta, not strictly wallpapers, became popular competitors, especially below a dado rail. They could be painted and washed, and were a good deal tougher, though also more expensive. Wallpaper manufacturing firms established in England in the 19th century included Jeffrey & Co.; Shand Kydd Ltd.;[2] Lightbown, Aspinall & Co.;[2] John Line & Sons;[2] Potter & Co.;[9] Arthur Sanderson & Sons; Townshend & Parker.[10] Designers included Owen Jones, William Morris, and Charles Voysey. In particular, many 19th century designs by Morris and Co and other Arts and Crafts designers remain in production. 20th century By the early twentieth century, wallpaper had established itself as one of the most popular household items across the Western world. Manufacturers in the USA included Sears;[11] designers included Andy Warhol.[12] Wallpaper has gone in and out of fashion since about 1930, but the overall trend has been for wallpaper-type patterned wallcoverings to lose ground to plain painted walls. Historical collections Historical examples of wallpaper are preserved by cultural institutions such as the Deutsches Tapetenmuseum (Kassel) in Germany;[13] the Musée des Arts Décoratifs (Paris) and Musée du Papier Peint (Rixheim) in France;[2] the Victoria & Albert in the UK;[14] the Smithsonian’s Cooper-Hewitt,[15] Historic New England,[16] Metropolitan Museum of Art,[17] U.S. National Park Service,[18][19] and Winterthur[20] in the USA. Types and sizes In terms of methods of creation, wallpaper types include painted wallpaper, hand-printed blockwood wallpaper, hand-printed stencil wallpaper, machine-printed wallpaper, and flock wallpaper.[2] Modern wallcoverings are diverse, and what is described as wallpaper may no longer actually be made from paper. Two of the most common factory trimmed sizes of wallpaper are referred to as “American” and “European” rolled goods. American rolled goods are 27 inches by 27 feet (8.2 m) in length. European rolled goods are 21.5 inches wide by 33 feet (10 m) in length. Approx. 60 square feet (5.6 m2). Most wallpaper borders are sold by linear foot and with a wide range of widths therefore square footage is not applicable. Although some may require trimming. The most common wall covering for residential use and generally the most economical is prepasted vinyl coated paper, commonly called “strippable” which can be misleading. Cloth backed vinyl is fairly common and durable. Lighter vinyls are easier to handle and hang. Paper backed vinyls are generally more expensive, significantly more difficult to hang, and can be found in wider untrimmed widths. Foil wallpaper generally has paper backing and can (exceptionally) be up to 36 inches wide, and be very difficult to handle and hang. Textile wallpapers include silks, linens, grass cloths, strings, rattan, and actual impressed leaves. There are acoustical wall carpets to reduce sound. Customized wallcoverings are available at high prices and most often have minimum roll orders. Solid vinyl with a cloth backing is the most common commercial wallcovering[citation needed] and comes from the factory as untrimmed at 54 inches approximately, to be overlapped and double cut by the installer. This same type can be pre-trimmed at the factory to 27 inches approximately. Furthermore, wallpaper comes in the form of borders, typically mounted horizontally, and commonly near ceiling level of homes. Borders come in varying widths and patterns. Modern developments Custom wallpaper printing New digital inkjet printing technologies using ultraviolet (UV) cured inks are being used for custom wallpaper production. Very small runs can be made, even a single wall. Photographs or digital art are output onto blank wallpaper material. Typical installations are corporate lobbies, restaurants, athletic facilities, and home interiors. This gives a designer the ability to give a space the exact look and feel desired. High-tech wallpaper New types of wallpaper under development or entering the market in the early 21st century include wallpaper that blocks certain mobile phone and WiFi signals, in the interest of privacy. The wallpaper is coated with a silver ink which forms crystals that block outgoing signals.[21] The Spanish firm Think Big Factory has announced that they are developing a wallpaper which also serves as a computer interface, using projectors, webcams, and motion sensors for control. As of 2013, The hardware was complete but only 20 per cent of the software was finished, according to Think Big Factory.[21] Seismic wallpaper In 2012, Scientists at the Institute of Solid Construction and Construction Material Technology at the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology announced that they had developed a wallpaper that can help keep a masonry wall from failing in an earthquake. The wallpaper uses glass fibre reinforcement in several directions and a special adhesive which forms a strong bond with the masonry when dry.[22] Installation Like paint, wallpaper requires proper surface preparation before application. Additionally wallpaper is not suitable for all areas. For example, bathroom wallpaper may deteriorate rapidly due to excessive steam. Proper preparation includes the repair of any defects in the drywall or plaster and the removal of loose material or old adhesives. For a better finish with thinner papers and poorer quality walls the wall can be cross-lined (horizontally) with lining paper first .Accurate room measurements (length, width, and height) along with number of window and door openings is essential for ordering wallpaper. Large drops, or repeats, in a pattern can be cut and hung more economically by working from alternating rolls of paper.[23] Besides conventional installation on interior walls and ceilings, wallpapers have been deployed as decorative covering for hatboxes, bandboxes, books, shelves, and window-shades.[24] Wallpaper adhesives Main article: Wallpaper adhesive Most wallpaper adhesive are starch or methylcellulose based. Removal Water The simplest removal option is to brush the paper with water. Water soaks through the paper and saturates the glue, allowing the paper to be peeled off. This does not work well with non-peelable vinyls, as vinyl is not porous. Nevertheless it is still effective on many modern papers. A mixture of 3:1 or 1:1 water and white vinegar is effective at dissolving glues. If the wallpaper is scored or sanded with a 20 grit floor sanding pad to scratch the surface solution, uptake will be more effective.[citation needed] Chemical wallpaper stripper Chemical wallpaper stripper can be purchased at most paint or home improvement stores. It is mixed with warm water or a mixture of warm water and vinegar, then sprayed onto wall surfaces. Several applications may be required to saturate the existing wallpaper. Perforation can aid in the absorption of the mixture and lead to faster removal. After the mixture has dissolved the wallpaper paste, the wallpaper can be removed easily by pulling at the edges and with the aid of a putty or drywall knife. Steam Another method of removal is to apply steam to wallpaper in order to dissolve the wallpaper paste. A wallpaper steamer consists of a reservoir of water, an electric heating element, and a hose to direct the steam at the wallpaper. The steam dissolves the wallpaper paste, allowing the wallpaper to be peeled off. However, care must be taken to prevent damage to the drywall underneath. Sometimes steaming can lead to the crumbling of underlying drywall or plaster, leaving an uneven surface to be repaired.

The Tighty-Whity Spider

The Tighty-Whity Spider

The tighty-whity spider went down the waterslide.
Got a water wedgie halfway down the ride.
Jumped up and screamed and ran around in pain.
Now the tighty-whity spider will not do that again.

Today I Had a Rotten Day

Today I Had a Rotten Day

Today I had a rotten day.
As I was coming in from play
I accidentally stubbed my toes
and tripped and fell and whacked my nose.
I chipped a tooth. I cut my lip.
I scraped my knee. I hurt my hip.
I pulled my shoulder, tweaked my ear,
and got a bruise upon my rear.
I banged my elbow, barked my shin.
A welt is forming on my chin.
My pencil poked me in the thigh.
I got an eyelash in my eye.
I sprained my back. I wrenched my neck.
I’m feeling like a total wreck.
So that’s the last time I refuse
when teacher says to tie my shoes.

Jub kabi bin mange

Jub kabi bin mange app per khushion ki bersaat ho,
Jub kabi app ka dil anjaani khushi se betaab ho,
To samaj lena koi aap ko duaon main yaad ker raha hai.
Happy Eid Day.

Eid ul adha is eid of sacrifice

Eid ul adha is eid of sacrifice, and commitment to Allahs orders,
May Allah bless us with the same in all circles of life,
and help all amongst us, who r helpless, worried,
and waiting for his rehmat,
Ameen.
“””Eid Mubarak”””

No shadows to depress u

No shadows to depress u,
Only joys to surround u,
God himself to bless u,
These r my wishes for u,
Today, tomorrow, and every day….
Eid Mubarak.

Sada haste raho jaise

Sada haste raho jaise haste hain phool,
Duniya ki sare gham tumeh jaye bhool,
Charo taraf phalao khushion ka geet,
Eisi ummid ka sath Yaar tumhe…
MUBARAK ho EID

GULSHAN KO KAR RAHI MO’ATTAR

GULSHAN KO KAR RAHI MO’ATTAR HAWA-E-EID
AATA NAHI KUCH NAZAR KUCH B SIWAYE EID
MERI TARAF SE EID MUBARAK HO AAP KO
BUS MERE PASS YEHI HAI TOHFAA RARA-E-EID

Tumne Mera Dil Chura Liya

Santa Hospital Me Ek Nurse Se Kehta He:
Tumne Mera Dil Chura Liya

Nurse(Sharmakar
):
Chal Jhute Hamne To Teri KIDNEY Churayi He

Santa and banta sending sms 2

Santa and banta sending sms 2 their gfs.Santa:mai tere mobile se apni gf ko sms bheju dekhte hain kya kahti hai?Banta:No,agr usne handwriting pehchan li to?